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OGRI
04-10-2010, 12:30 AM
Can anyone explain to me why some motoGP riders throw their feet out when entering corners? Is it to do with weight transfer? If so why not put the weight on the pegs??? Altho i think weight tranfer is part of it..i also believe its also an attempt at a block, to prevent or hinder any following rider from trying to dash up the inside....Opinions/Feedback please????

thanks.gif

Sticky Valve
04-10-2010, 12:57 AM
it helps block or hinder a following rider from over takin . plus it helps weight transfer

some GP rider the likes of ROSSI will do this coming up to a corner anyway . iys there style of riding . where with ROSSI he is gifted can change riding styles in a heartbeat .

to add today ROSSI was in great form despite bein injured . he thought lorenzo a lesson lol .

CB_Phil
04-10-2010, 07:19 AM
Rossi was the one to start the new style, it seems to imitate Motocross & Supermoto ridin which he indulges in on his time off. It originally appeared to be used when he was really pushin it & breakin late (which he does better than anyone), now thou it also seems to be used as an effective way of makin the bike wider & harder to get past in turns.

OGRI
04-10-2010, 10:46 AM
So it IS a bit of both then....thats what i figured. Yeah sticky...rossi taught him a thing or ten....that lozenge guy is an ape imho...he forced rossi about to get to the front but bottled it when rossi pushed back hard....lil shit...lol

ezzy rider
04-10-2010, 11:34 AM
for once i agree totally wid ya og, LORENZO IS A MONKEY MUPPET!!!!

that was some battle between Rossi and him though, i had ta muffle myself from screaming at the telly as there were people sleeping in the house...

UP DA DOCTOR!!!

OGRI
04-10-2010, 05:15 PM
for once i agree totally wid ya og, LORENZO IS A MONKEY MUPPET!!!!

that was some battle between Rossi and him though, i had ta muffle myself from screaming at the telly as there were people sleeping in the house...

UP DA DOCTOR!!!


And let that be the last time...lol

OGRI
05-10-2010, 01:48 AM
And now the lil fucker is whinging....CUNT

Fourth position at Motegi has done little to dent Jorge Lorenzo's hopes of securing the 2010 MotoGP World Championship but the Spaniard was left extremely unhappy with the manner in which he missed out on a podium finish to team-mate and current World Champion Valentino Rossi.

Their Japanese battle began at the first turn of the opening lap and as the two remained in close contact throughout the race the fight for third really heated up towards the end of the 24-lap contest, with daring moves and touching fairings the highlights in a tense battle that engrossed everyone watching on. Rossi managed to edge the result and whilst Lorenzo was understandably disappointed at finishing off the podium for only the second time this season, it was the nature in which he did so that left him with a bitter taste in his mouth.

"The show is great for the people to enjoy and the business of motorcycle racing, it's fantastic, but when you are a rider who is on a MotoGP bike which gets up to 300 km/h in the straight and 180-200 km/h in the corners and you are feeling the other rider touch you it's not a great feeling or a good emotion because you know you are putting your life at risk," said Lorenzo in the attached video interview. "The three or four moves I made on Valentino I felt were correct and fair. On the other hand his moves were legal but on the limit, from my point of view. We have seen the way he likes to fight, it happened before with Gibernau, then with Stoner, and now with me. Maybe in the future his rivals will get a little bit mad and we will act like he usually does!"

Lorenzo added: "We are team-mates, I am fighting for the Riders' Championship but we are both fighting for the Teams' and Manufacturers' Championship as well and we have to remember this. I am disappointed to miss the podium of course because I wanted one at Yamaha's home, but this is racing."

The decision to go with the medium front Bridgestone tyre as opposed to the hard option that his rivals opted for was a key factor in his race as well said Lorenzo. "It was obvious after the race that our choice was not the best but we can't change the situation. We made a mistake with the front tyre and I didn't have so much confidence in the front so for this reason it was difficult to overtake Valentino. We also chose the old engine because with the new one we would waste a lot of fuel and would not finish the race."

Lorenzo remains on the verge of sealing his first premier class title and leads the standings by 69 points ahead of injured rival Dani Pedrosa heading into Round 15 of 18 at Sepang next weekend.

"I am very happy at the moment because we are very close to achieving a dream that has been in the making for 20 years. It was nice to get the 250cc World titles but now we are talking about something much bigger. Maybe in Malaysia we can get it and we will then celebrate, and after in Spain," he concluded.

Sticky Valve
05-10-2010, 01:53 AM
fuck him the cryin little wanker .

ROSSI is GOD in MOTOGP .

OGRI
05-10-2010, 01:58 AM
More irony...he made references to what rossi did to gibernau and stoner...and both of them were/are whiners too...moaning when they lost and blaming anyone but themselves....lorenzo isnt worthy to even be on the same grid as Rossi.

Sticky Valve
05-10-2010, 02:04 AM
ROSSI has done it all in motogp . he is the the best out there and the likes of lorenzo will need more time and exrerience before he can hold a candle to ROSSI

CB_Phil
05-10-2010, 11:35 AM
Its racin & didnt these lads all come up from the 125s & 250s!!! They spend their life bouncin offa one & other on those grids. I knew hed also blame the front tyre, seen him goin over & shakin his head after he seen the camera in the garage. His a little wanker whos been tryin to imitate Rossi all season. Neither himself or the other wanker deserve the championship.
Roll on 2011

ezzy rider
05-10-2010, 11:43 AM
the crying little muppet!!!
Rossi likes ta get out and play, and he stated very clearly after the race that he was teaching the whinging one a lesson after Lorenzo blocked him with the pass at the beginning of the race, tampering his chances ta fight for the top position... well deserved, and the muppet been asking for it, so ta speak!

Malcolm
26-10-2010, 10:12 AM
Rossi was the one to start the new style

Wrong answer....lol...
think it Mamola or Rayney or one of them lads to start it off back in the day,,,

OGRI
26-10-2010, 07:34 PM
Wrong answer....lol...
think it Mamola or Rayney or one of them lads to start it off back in the day,,,

Can you find a clip where Randy Mamola or wayne rainey or kevin schwantz or mick doohan use this new 'foot out' style???

I'd like to see it as I spent my formative years watching these guys bash fairings in every possible race....schwantz and mamola liked to drift and slide, rainey was tight, doohan hung off the bike but i dont recall any of em hanging a leg out except to signal the bike was broken and they were pulling over......

OGRI
26-10-2010, 11:11 PM
OK Malcolm..... you are now entering the world of complex physics and much debate on how you steer a bike and how a bike reacts to various inputs and chassis dynamics but here are a few thoughts.....

You can steer a bike with a number of inputs such as:

Weighting footpegs - get the bike stable in a nice straight line and push down on one footpeg and feel what happens.

Body position - gently move your body position from side to side and you will feel the bike turn.

Counter steering - this is the complex physics and discussion bit, but if you very gently push on the left handlebar you will feel the bike tip in towards the left and vice versa. A good way to do this naturally is to slowly drop your shoulder to the inside of the turn.

And now to add to this list is Rossi and co throwing a leg out to shift the centre of gravity...

Here is a vid that shows how to corner without using your hands....

danger.gif DO NOT TRY THIS danger.gif


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuRlxpC9l-g&feature=related

CB_Phil
26-10-2010, 11:14 PM
Thats feckin mad Og. Sure Even if the lads did it back in the day, would love to see a lip myself, it was Rossi who brought it to modern GP

OGRI
26-10-2010, 11:22 PM
See a lip??? Sure....here two for ya...http://www.fullhalloween.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/red-noir-lips.jpg

xenon10
27-10-2010, 09:37 AM
I thought rossi started that foot out lark too...i thought at first it was a "oh shit i ve gone in too fast" moment!!

Malcolm
27-10-2010, 03:20 PM
yea great clip that ..Dont think I will be trying his method though...lol..

As for the leg out thing ...I still wonder over that ...Think its a mental thing...
Sure every tom dick and harry is at it now .. Surprised no one started a group in face book yet "I get my leg out in corners" LMAO..
Throw in a ball and we can have a new sport moto polo gp....willy_nilly.gif

OGRI
27-10-2010, 05:51 PM
yea great clip that ..Dont think I will be trying his method though...lol..

As for the leg out thing ...I still wonder over that ...Think its a mental thing...
Sure every tom dick and harry is at it now .. Surprised no one started a group in face book yet "I get my leg out in corners" LMAO..
Throw in a ball and we can have a new sport moto polo gp....willy_nilly.gif

So do you accept that it was Rossi who started it and all the other sheep followed???? LOL

Malcolm
05-12-2010, 11:12 AM
Can you find a clip where Randy Mamola or wayne rainey or kevin schwantz or mick doohan use this new 'foot out' style???

I'd like to see it as I spent my formative years watching these guys bash fairings in every possible race....schwantz and mamola liked to drift and slide, rainey was tight, doohan hung off the bike but i dont recall any of em hanging a leg out except to signal the bike was broken and they were pulling over......

Looks like Brian Reid was even at the Foot out before Rossi... around 3.00 3.03 in the vid ..Listen to commentators

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlA2LMd2TR4

Cant find where I seen the bit about it happening in the early GP stuff

CB_Phil
05-12-2010, 12:21 PM
Absolutely crackin clip man

OGRI
20-12-2012, 10:59 AM
Update...

http://www.asphaltandrubber.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/dani-pedrosa-laguna-seca-1270-635x423.jpg


Watch a modern MotoGP, Moto2 or World Superbike race with a casual fan and you can be certain there is one question they will ask you: “Why are they waving their legs about like that?” Many theories have been offered, often directly contradicting each other.

For example, several years ago, I suggested that the leg wave is entirely mental. Earlier this year, the Australian motorcycle coaching organization MotoDNA described the possible role which aerodynamics play, the exposed leg helping to create more drag. Much has been said, yet it seems impossible to settle the argument one way or another.

Asking the riders to explain does not help much. It is a question I and other journalists have asked of many different riders, including Valentino Rossi, Casey Stoner, Cal Crutchlow, and Dani Pedrosa. Their answers always boil down to the same thing: “It just feels natural,” they say. An interesting response, perhaps providing an insight into how deeply racers have internalized so much of the physical part of their riding, but not doing much to help explain the phenomenon.

To attempt to get to the bottom of this mystery, I turned to some of the best minds in the MotoGP paddock. For an explanation of the physics behind the leg wave, I asked Monster Tech 3 Yamaha crew chief and technical guru Guy Coulon, while for further insight from the point of view of an observer and ex-rider, I spoke to Wilco Zeelenberg, team manager of Jorge Lorenzo – the one current MotoGP rider who does not dangle his leg while riding.

The answer, said Coulon, was not simple. “This is quite difficult to answer. We can believe that when you put your legs in this position on braking, the center of gravity is more inside and you can keep straighter on braking for a longer time.” So was the point of the leg wave to move the center of gravity of bike and rider? “I think so, because on braking, you have to be quite straight on the bike, so you cannot move your shoulder or anything else,” Coulon replied.

Coulon accepted that the mental aspect could be one reason which riders dangle their legs. Could it be that seeing other riders do it, and believing it conferred an advantage, other riders start to copy the behavior? “Yes, of course,” Coulon agreed, but more physical aspects also played a role. “But maybe also because of bike geometry, and the kind of tire being used, and what they are able to do on corner entry, so step-by-step they can use this sticking the leg outside,” the Frenchman added.

“But for me, it’s really complicated to explain.” He had seen the maneuver become ever more prevalent among riders, Coulon said. “Like everybody else, I can see step-by-step, one rider, two riders, and more and more riders are using this style. But themselves, they don’t know really why, and sometimes they don’t feel they are doing it.”

In a previous article, I argued that Valentino Rossi was one of the first riders to start to use his leg off the pegs on a regular basis, and that the fact that he saw other riders copying him gave him a confidence boost and a mental advantage. Though Coulon emphasized that he believed there were sound physical reasons for the leg wave, he agreed that riders tend to watch each other closely and copy each other.

“I think it is similar to when the first riders started to use sliders on the knees. One guy started to do that because it helped him control the slide, and it was like a sensor to check the lean angle, then after this, everybody started to use this style,” Coulon explained. “But I think [dangling] legs outside can be used for better stability, and to keep the center of gravity center more inside in the corner where the rider is going, to keep the bike straighter for longer, to keep it in the same position.”

Was there any evidence in the masses of data collected after every session which might help to explain exactly what was happening? “I think it’s a bit complicated to see on the data,” Coulon said.

“Maybe if someone was focused on this and tried to find something in the data, they could. We didn’t try. But for sure, using data, it would be possible to test with a test rider, for example, and we could understand with the same speed, the same deceleration, the same line, with the legs [dangling] outside or not, if the angle is same or different. But for sure angle would be different.”

The question is whether a test rider would even be capable of performing the test, as the styles required are so very different. “It’s not so easy to ask one rider to change his style only to compare the data,” Coulon added. “It seems they are doing it without thinking, finally.” Mainly, it was a question of balance, he said, the leg being used “like a tightrope walker uses his pole to keep his balance.”

The one rider who does not use the leg wave is Jorge Lorenzo. “Yes, but Lorenzo is very stable on the brakes, because of his own style,” Coulon explained. “Because he is really really smooth everywhere, so we never see him with real jumping on the brakes, he controls everything very smoothly, he brakes, releases the brakes very gently. and early. He can carry a lot of corner speed, then also opening [the throttle] he is very smooth. It seems he needs to find less extra stability, because he is already stable because of his own personal style. He always looks very clean.”

Wilco Zeelenberg agrees. As Jorge Lorenzo’s team manager, part of his role is as acting as rider coach and helping identify areas where the Spaniard is having problems. As part of this, he spends a lot of time at track side watching Lorenzo, and assessing what is going on. Zeelenberg agrees with Coulon, it is the smoothness of Lorenzo’s style which precludes him taking his feet of the pegs.

“He’s not really an extremely late braker,” Zeelenberg said. “He wants to keep his bike as stable as possible, as soon as you take your leg off the peg the bike begins to wander, and you have to search for stability. It looks to me like they [the riders who dangle their legs] are looking for stability this way, because they have so much pressure on the front wheel. They are trying to gain some control over the bike, to keep it stable, but [Jorge] never lets it get that far.”

So Lorenzo is creating stability in a different way? “He brakes a little earlier, but in a different way, so he never arrives at the corner with the bike on its front wheel, which makes it want to go all over the place, which makes you lose control. Your foot is a good lever to handle this.” Lorenzo arrives at the corner with the bike already under control and at the right speed, Zeelenberg explained.

As a rider, Zeelenberg said, he had never taken his leg off the pegs, so he could not speak from personal experience. But he could see how it seems to work for some riders, from the time he has spent at trackside watching. “It seems to have a limited advantage. So I think for some riders, especially really late brakers, it helps,” Zeelenberg explained. “When you brake really, really late, your heart rate goes up a lot, your pulse starts really racing, and you stiffen and cramp on the bike. That’s no good. By throwing your leg off the bike, you relax again, which makes it possible for you to stick the bike into the corner.”

“The leg helps with this,” Zeelenberg continued, “because you can throw the bike to the left a lot more easily. If you’re braking, and thinking ‘Shit! I’m too late,’ at the moment the riders get that ‘shit!’ feeling, that’s the moment they take their foot off the peg. They realize that at the moment they have that feeling, and stick their leg out, they can still make the corner.”

It is a way of breaking through their own mental fear of braking too late, Zeelenberg explained. “Everyone has a sort of mental barrier at which point you think ‘Shit, I’m not going to make it,” at that point, you cramp up even more, and then you won’t make the corner.” So it is a way in which riders force themselves to loosen up again, to take away the cramped stiffness?

“Yes. But also, it’s left-handed corners. None of them stick their right legs out if there’s a left turn coming. So it definitely has something to do with balance, but also with forcing the bike into the corner at the moment you stick your leg out.”

So there it rests for now...until someone else comes up with a better explanation....thumbup.gif

pawh
20-12-2012, 11:27 AM
i always assumed the riders were losing balance or something and put the leg out as a natural instinct, lol

Hellraiser
20-12-2012, 01:48 PM
i always assumed the riders were losing balance or something and put the leg out as a natural instinct, lol

I always thought it was to do with weight transfer and to make the bike wider to prevent the rider behind from overtaking.