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OGRI
11-01-2011, 10:26 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIMQ0c7JKIU&feature=player_embedded

EXCLUDED FROM racing against similar electric machines thanks to newly-introduced weight limits, American electric bike racer Chip Yates has put his 194bhp machine up against a grid full of 1000cc petrol-powered bikes. And ended up on the podium. Twice.
Check the video to see just how quickly his single-geared electric-powered bike, based around a Suzuki GSX-R750 frame, out-drags the 1000cc twins he was matched against at Fontana speedway in California. His bike – which can't race in the TTXGP series because, at around 270kg, it's above the 250kg weight limit for the championship – managed 158mph on the straights, and landed him on the podium twice, with third in the WERA Heavyweight Twins Superbike class and second place in the Heavyweight Twins Superstock category.
Admittedly it wasn't a world-class grid, and at only six laps the races favoured the relatively short range of electric bikes, but it's still an achievement that could barely have been contemplated just a couple of years ago, before the first Isle of Man TTXGP race brought the idea of electric race bikes to the fore.
On Twitter, Yates simply said: “History has been made, and the gasoline bikes are on notice!!”
PS: It's always hard to get used to a new year, isn't it? Yates has marked his video as “January 9, 2010” - actually the race was yesterday, not a year ago...I guess he doesn't know how to set the date on his battery powered camera....LOL
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Hellraiser
11-01-2011, 10:44 PM
Mental....some whine off the fucker!!

Kido
11-01-2011, 10:55 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PAHyBDwS-Q&feature=related

TT zero in the Isle last year.

Jeez there's some power in that machine in the 1st vid.

OGRI
11-01-2011, 11:07 PM
The beauty of an electric motor is the power is exponentially linear and there is no lag/flat spots and if it blew up theres fuck all oil to clean up....and if it does give trouble then diagnosis is easy peasy

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OGRI
11-02-2011, 01:01 AM
There’s something happening on the electric side of the motorcycle industry, but no one is talking publicly about it. It’s a fragile idea, and it feels like even mentioning it could jeopardize its very existence. Lately so many influential people involved with electric motorcycles have independently brought up the subject of consolidation.
If one could take the best pieces from the various electric motorcycle startups, you’d have a formidable company that was capable of giving the OEMs a real run for their money.
The conversation on consolidation was gradual at first, as you’d hear someone say in passing, “I really like what Company A is doing with Technology X, if only we could combine that with Company B’s work on Technology Y.” About six months ago, the pundits on the sidelines started getting more vocal about the subject though, and were fueled by the ailing economy . The driving forces behind this are probably equal helpings of listening to pundits, struggling to raise capital, and watching the established big OEMs begin to dip their toes into the Electric Vehicle (EV) waters. A recurring question asked of the four companies was what was the game plan when (insert Japanese or European manufacturer name here) entered the electric motorcycle market? ....the outcome will look something along the lines of the complete decimation of the only real innovation to hit motorcycling the past decade or two. The exits for these companies are rapidly closing.
Every company should have an exit strategy, and the good startups have more than one. For electric vehicles the exits however are limited to acquisition, strategic partnership, market domination, and oblivion. The oblivion exit is an easy one to explain: it’s an exit to the trash can. Sadly for most of the companies playing in this market, the ones simply assembling off-the-shelf parts, that’s where they’re going to end up. Electric powertrain technology is rapidly evolving, and if you’re not developing the cutting edge that’s pushing the evolution of motorcycling, you are going to be left by the wayside. This of course means that EV’s need to develop their own intellectual property, which we see the larger ones doing…in spades. There is a trend for these startups to become more like IP houses than actual motorcycle companies, and that’s because there is value in licensing the technology to larger OEMs and strategic partners. It’s an idea that plays to the core strengths of a small company that is high on intellect, but low on capital. The downside is that it’s like playing Russian Roulette.

IP-based strategic partnerships almost universally end with the larger company either reverse engineering the smaller company’s technology, or using that technology as a bridge, while the larger company builds its own IP up to the market standards. The strategic partnership is alive and well in the EV world, it is really only a matter of time before these startups are cooked and served up for dinner by the OEMs they are partnering with currently. The more advanced variation of the strategic partnership exit, is the acquisition. The recipe is the same, except the intellectual property involved might be more advanced or more costly to reproduce. There could also be some elements of brand value at play, or considerable traction in a market segment. Whatever the case may be, at the end of the day the companies banking on this exit are hoping that an OEM comes along who wants to rapidly enter the electric market, and the cost of them doing it alone are greater than the cost of buying an established player already in the market, it has one fatal flaw that no one realized. The reason electric vehicle startups were able to dabble in the motorcycle industry in the first place, virtually unhindered by the OEMs, is because none of the OEMs had the available resources to compete in making electric motorcycles (apparently there is a recession going on).

Of course the same set of circumstances that created this EV sandbox are what’s keeping OEMs from making acquisitions now, as all the major manufacturers are still licking their wounds and watching their pocketbooks from the failed economy. Add into the mix that none of the electric motorcycle manufacturers are pumping out impressive numbers of bikes to consumers, and the call for acquisition becomes even smaller. The strategy at hand for the OEMs is simple at this point, and was predictable two years ago. The major manufacturers are content to sit around and watch the various EV startups prove the electric motorcycle market, and develop the technologies necessary to make these vehicles practical for motorcycle enthusiasts. This is all while the OEMs sit in their R&D facilities, and polish their designs and technology, waiting for when the cost comes down and the performance goes up. They’ll partner with a few companies, likely to keep tabs on them if for no other reason, but there won’t be a lot of money in these deals. All the while the moment for that quick exit through acquisition slips farther and farther away, until one day these startups will wake up and see a bevy of competitors with established brands, worldwide distribution, and massive budgets competing with them. The outcome won’t be pretty, and this is where the consolidation comes into play.

While the OEMs are able to cherry-pick the startups one-by-one at will, the combined resources of these companies, developing a truly intriguing electric motorcycle package, is a much larger obstacle to overcome. Not only could the strengths of each product offering be combined into one, but more importantly having a number of these companies under one roof would not only limit the options of the OEMs in piggybacking off of their developments, but it would also eliminate the current competition for fundraising, both in the private and public sectors. If you power down the Powerpoint slides, and set aside the investor pitch decks, you’d find a universal element existed at the creation of these companies: to start an actual electric motorcycle company. That goal is still attainable, and could be the starting point for a shared collaboration between these firms.

Talk amongst yourselves.....thumbup01.gif

pawh
11-02-2011, 01:11 AM
jesus that bike has some torque. unreal

fabio
20-02-2011, 06:02 PM
There’s something happening on the electric side of the motorcycle industry, but no one is talking publicly about it. It’s a fragile idea, and it feels like even mentioning it could jeopardize its very existence. Lately so many influential people involved with electric motorcycles have independently brought up the subject of consolidation.
If one could take the best pieces from the various electric motorcycle startups, you’d have a formidable company that was capable of giving the OEMs a real run for their money.
The conversation on consolidation was gradual at first, as you’d hear someone say in passing, “I really like what Company A is doing with Technology X, if only we could combine that with Company B’s work on Technology Y.” About six months ago, the pundits on the sidelines started getting more vocal about the subject though, and were fueled by the ailing economy . The driving forces behind this are probably equal helpings of listening to pundits, struggling to raise capital, and watching the established big OEMs begin to dip their toes into the Electric Vehicle (EV) waters. A recurring question asked of the four companies was what was the game plan when (insert Japanese or European manufacturer name here) entered the electric motorcycle market? ....the outcome will look something along the lines of the complete decimation of the only real innovation to hit motorcycling the past decade or two. The exits for these companies are rapidly closing.
Every company should have an exit strategy, and the good startups have more than one. For electric vehicles the exits however are limited to acquisition, strategic partnership, market domination, and oblivion. The oblivion exit is an easy one to explain: it’s an exit to the trash can. Sadly for most of the companies playing in this market, the ones simply assembling off-the-shelf parts, that’s where they’re going to end up. Electric powertrain technology is rapidly evolving, and if you’re not developing the cutting edge that’s pushing the evolution of motorcycling, you are going to be left by the wayside. This of course means that EV’s need to develop their own intellectual property, which we see the larger ones doing…in spades. There is a trend for these startups to become more like IP houses than actual motorcycle companies, and that’s because there is value in licensing the technology to larger OEMs and strategic partners. It’s an idea that plays to the core strengths of a small company that is high on intellect, but low on capital. The downside is that it’s like playing Russian Roulette.

IP-based strategic partnerships almost universally end with the larger company either reverse engineering the smaller company’s technology, or using that technology as a bridge, while the larger company builds its own IP up to the market standards. The strategic partnership is alive and well in the EV world, it is really only a matter of time before these startups are cooked and served up for dinner by the OEMs they are partnering with currently. The more advanced variation of the strategic partnership exit, is the acquisition. The recipe is the same, except the intellectual property involved might be more advanced or more costly to reproduce. There could also be some elements of brand value at play, or considerable traction in a market segment. Whatever the case may be, at the end of the day the companies banking on this exit are hoping that an OEM comes along who wants to rapidly enter the electric market, and the cost of them doing it alone are greater than the cost of buying an established player already in the market, it has one fatal flaw that no one realized. The reason electric vehicle startups were able to dabble in the motorcycle industry in the first place, virtually unhindered by the OEMs, is because none of the OEMs had the available resources to compete in making electric motorcycles (apparently there is a recession going on).

Of course the same set of circumstances that created this EV sandbox are what’s keeping OEMs from making acquisitions now, as all the major manufacturers are still licking their wounds and watching their pocketbooks from the failed economy. Add into the mix that none of the electric motorcycle manufacturers are pumping out impressive numbers of bikes to consumers, and the call for acquisition becomes even smaller. The strategy at hand for the OEMs is simple at this point, and was predictable two years ago. The major manufacturers are content to sit around and watch the various EV startups prove the electric motorcycle market, and develop the technologies necessary to make these vehicles practical for motorcycle enthusiasts. This is all while the OEMs sit in their R&D facilities, and polish their designs and technology, waiting for when the cost comes down and the performance goes up. They’ll partner with a few companies, likely to keep tabs on them if for no other reason, but there won’t be a lot of money in these deals. All the while the moment for that quick exit through acquisition slips farther and farther away, until one day these startups will wake up and see a bevy of competitors with established brands, worldwide distribution, and massive budgets competing with them. The outcome won’t be pretty, and this is where the consolidation comes into play.

While the OEMs are able to cherry-pick the startups one-by-one at will, the combined resources of these companies, developing a truly intriguing electric motorcycle package, is a much larger obstacle to overcome. Not only could the strengths of each product offering be combined into one, but more importantly having a number of these companies under one roof would not only limit the options of the OEMs in piggybacking off of their developments, but it would also eliminate the current competition for fundraising, both in the private and public sectors. If you power down the Powerpoint slides, and set aside the investor pitch decks, you’d find a universal element existed at the creation of these companies: to start an actual electric motorcycle company. That goal is still attainable, and could be the starting point for a shared collaboration between these firms.

Talk amongst yourselves.....thumbup01.gif

Very interesting reading there...

OGRI
29-06-2011, 01:36 AM
Chip Yates claimed two records at the 89th running of the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb: the most powerful motorcycle ever to race on the mountain, with 241hp, and the fastest electric motorcycle ever to finish the 12.42 mile climb and its 156 turns. Finishing with a time of 12:50.094, Yates not only smashed the previous electric motorcycle record by over four minutes, but also raced to the top of Pikes Peak with a very respectable time on a motorcycle, even for a rookie.

In the video you can see how much time Chip loses in the dirt section (he was officially the 97th fastest out of 112 racers in that section), though on the paved sections showed true speed (9th fastest overall on the first section of asphalt). With Pikes Peak to be completely paved for its 90th running in 2012, Yates and his crew will have a leg-up on the competition for further dropping the mountain’s fastest pace, and for showing that electrics can compete, and even best, their internal combustion engine counterparts. It seems electric bikes are going to be a BIG part of our future folks....better get ready!!!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EI6IhNqGCU&feature=player_embedded#at=62

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Rosie
29-06-2011, 03:44 PM
Hmmm think I prefer the sound of this


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcWxwAn0sy8&feature=related

to the whiny noise from the other bikes like this:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHmvkRoEowc&feature=related

zx10rick
29-06-2011, 06:14 PM
tis only a matter of counting down the clock till these bikes are the norm.......especialy at the rate their moving in regards to advances in technoligy..

Rosie
30-06-2011, 12:37 PM
Saw a clip of an Enduro on the MCN youtube page and the bike has only 9 moving parts, 3 of which are in the engine! Talk about low maintenance and servicing!